Cover Letter It Manager Position

One woman wrote a cover letter from her dog’s perspective.This professional even turned hers into a Buzz Feed-style list! But being excessively formal can actually backfire on you, career expert Mark Slack points out: “It makes you seem insincere and even robotic, not anything like the friendly, approachable, and awesome-to-work-with person you are.” Even when you’re applying for a very corporate role, there’s usually room to express yourself in a conversational, genuine way.

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When you don’t meet all of the job requirements, it’s tempting to use lines like, “Despite my limited experience as a manager…” or “While I may not have direct experience in marketing…” But why apologize?

Instead of drawing attention to your weaknesses, emphasize the strengths and transferable skills you do have.

Typically the most important requirements for the position will be listed first in the job description, or mentioned more than once.

You’ll want to make sure you describe how you can deliver on those key priorities.

But downplay the adverbs a bit, and just write like a normal person. There are always exceptions to the rule, but in general, for resumes and cover letters alike, don’t go over a page.

If you tend to have a hard time writing about yourself, here’s a quick trick: What would your favorite boss, your best friend, or your mentor say about you? In one survey, more than two-thirds of employers said they preferred a cover letter that’s either just half a page (around 250 words) or “the shorter the better.” Having trouble getting rid of your carefully crafted sentences?(Psst: You can also take this approach with a skills-based resume.) Students writing cover letters for internships and new grads often make the mistake of over-focusing on their educational backgrounds.At the end of the day, what hiring managers care about most is your work experience (and yes, that can be volunteer or internship experience, too)—and what you can walk through the door and deliver on day one.However, if you’re gunning for a more creative or startup job—or need to explain to the hiring manager, say, how your career has taken you from teaching to business development—a different approach could be appropriate.Here at The Muse, we’ve seen cover letters use bullet points, tell stories, or showcase videos to (successfully) get their point across.Try to identify the company’s pain points—the problem or problems that they need the person they hire to solve.Then emphasize the skills and experience you have that make you the right person to solve them. Not sure what skills and experiences you should be featuring?Used sparingly, great feedback from former co-workers, managers, or clients can go a long way toward illustrating your passion or skills.Here’s an example of how you might weave it in: “When I oversaw our last office move, my color-coded spreadsheets covering every minute detail of the logistics were legendary; my manager said I was so organized, she’d trust me to plan an expedition to Mars.” If you’re applying to a more traditional company, then the tried-and-true three-to-five-paragraph format probably makes sense.Did you bring in more clients than any of your peers? You don’t even have to have worked with numbers at all!Check out a few more tips for adding stats to those resume bullets, even if your previous jobs involved dealing with people, not figures.

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