Child Labour In Bangladesh Essays

Child Labour In Bangladesh Essays-36
In this chapter and the report, we follow the ILO usage and use the term “child labor” to mean work that is hazardous to the emotional and physical development of children below a specified minimum age, as distinguished from “child work,” which is not automatically considered problematic.This chapter offers a framework for assessing the progress toward the elimination of child labor, identifying the problems encountered, and suggesting effective means for accelerating progress.Households find it cheaper to use children than to hire adult wage laborers as household help and in their farms and enterprises.

In this chapter and the report, we follow the ILO usage and use the term “child labor” to mean work that is hazardous to the emotional and physical development of children below a specified minimum age, as distinguished from “child work,” which is not automatically considered problematic.This chapter offers a framework for assessing the progress toward the elimination of child labor, identifying the problems encountered, and suggesting effective means for accelerating progress.Households find it cheaper to use children than to hire adult wage laborers as household help and in their farms and enterprises.

However, most of the children at work in the world are engaged in activities and for lengths of time in each day that are detrimental to their healthy physical and intellectual development, their education, and their productivity or earning capacity in adulthood.

Child labor not only harms the child, but also perpetuates poverty and compromises economic growth and equitable development.

Since both child workers and their parents are often illiterate, em- ployers are able to manipulate the amount they deduct from wages of children toward debt service and thus keep children in bonded labor for a long time (Human Rights Watch, 2003).

Also, the occupations in which children are valued as workers because of their dexterity (e.g., carpet making) often involve unhealthy working conditions and long working hours.

Very poor parents cannot afford to forgo the income that a child worker brings to the family, let alone meet the out-of-pocket costs of sending the child to school, even though they realize that depriving the child of an education will most likely condemn her or him to a life in poverty as an adult.

In this sense, as the ILO has noted, child labor is both a cause and a consequence of poverty, contributing to a perpetuation of household poverty across generations.

Both supply and demand for child workers are important to developing such an understanding.

On the supply side, the most common reason for parents to put their children to work is extreme poverty.

Even though parents understand the long-term deleterious consequences of interrupted schooling, they do not have savings or access to credit in order to smooth over temporary shocks to household income.

Opportunities to borrow, other than from friends and relatives, are limited in developing countries because they do not have functioning financial systems, either microcredit institutions or more traditional banks.

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